Should I book now or wait, that is my question ??? What should I do ???

I have been asked this question so many times during my 22-year career in this business that I decided to write an article on it and to save it as a resource for each time I get asked this question.

Should I book now my vacation now or wait for a deal? While nothing in life is guaranteed except death and taxes what I am about to tell you is a given fact that you can take to the bank 80-90% of the time. Those are excellent winning odds, even in Las Vegas.

If you book in advance you will always get the cruise lines version of their “book early” discount. Most of the time as the ship is empty early in the booking process they will offer the bigger discounts. As the ship begins to fill up the discount they offer you will start to decrease. Most people think the cruise lines lowball the prices right before the cruise. WRONG !!!!!  It doesn’t work that way.

You can’t have your cake and eat it too. If you wait closer to the sail date to book your cruise and there happens to be some kind of promotion going on be prepared NOT to get something that you were really hoping for. More than likely the dining time you really want will be on a waitlist. You might want a balcony, but there isn’t any left so now you have to suffice with just a window cabin, or an interior cabin. More than likely the last cabins available on the ship will be by the staircase, elevator, the front or back of the ship, next to the pantry area or under some very noisy and busy public area. So, while you may have saved a few bucks on your cruise you can now stay up even later at night since you won’t be able to get a good night sleep in your noisy cabin. On the flip side if you book early you will get the early booking discount, and will get to choose your specific deck and cabin, and will even have your choice of dining times.

Let’s do some math. Say I book a cruise a year in advance and my balcony cabin is $1,000 per person. With 2 people in the room that would be $2,000. Now 3 months before the cruise they come up with a Texas resident, a senior or a military promotion. You are so happy that you decided to wait and book this cruise now instead of doing it a year in advance like I did. You’re super excited because you got a deal by waiting and I did not. They are offering 30% off the first passenger and a $50 onboard credit per cabin. What you fail to realize is that your balcony price because you waited so long to book this cruise has increased to $1,300 per person or $2,600 for 2 people, and with a 30% discount off the first person (-$390) that brings it down to $2,210. And even if you take off the $50 of onboard credit that takes your price down to $2,160. You’re feeling proud of yourself because you took advantage of a good promotion and brought your $2,600 cruise down to $2,160. When I booked the cruise, there was no promotion except the basic early booking promotion and I paid $2,000. So, you ended up paying $2,160 and I paid $2,000. Let me ask you a question, “who paid less?”. And again, I got the dinner time I wanted and you are more than likely going to get waitlisted for what you want and probably won’t even get it. I also have a great cabin location right in the center of the ship in a nice and quiet area. Because you waited to book your cruise everyone else beat you to the prime cabin locations. Your choices now are probably underneath the cafeteria which has a crew working above your head 24 hours a day making noise, underneath the noisy pool area, or underneath the disco with loud music echoing through your walls until 3am.

If you book in advance you will also get to split up the deposit and final payment date helping you to spread out your payments and budget for your vacation. If you book within 3-4 months of departure you will have to come up with the full amount all at once.

This philosophy not only applies to cruises, it applies to all vacations including all those great all-inclusive resorts in Mexico and the Caribbean. I will bet you money that any smart shopper will want the cheapest, shortest, and most direct airline schedule to begin and end their vacation with. Once the wise folks buy these seats up you will be left with the longer and more expensive flights.

So, there you have it.

Steve Rice
The Cruise Butler
830-981-2445

Cruising is like a box of chocolates

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forrest gump I was recently dealing with a customer who called me regarding a Canada and New England cruise. He contacted me and as always I got back to him very quickly because I know just how hard it is to get good availability on this type of cruise, especially just 6 months prior to the anticipated departure date.

That’s when I thought about a quote from Forrest Gump. His famous saying of “Mama always said, life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get” is just like booking travel.

Stick with me here with the chocolate analogy and cruises. You can go to any grocery store any day of the year and buy a box of chocolates. There is always plenty to choose from, just like Caribbean cruises. If your grocery store runs out of one box of chocolates, then there is always another box sitting right next to it. Again just like a Caribbean cruise, if the one ship and date you want is too expensive or sold out then there is always another comparable cruise to choose from, or you can go a week earlier or later. It’s your choice, no big deal.download (3)

Now let’s take a box of Valentine’s Day chocolates dressed up in a pretty heart-shaped box with a bow on it. These special chocolates are seasonal and are not available year round; they are only available for a very limited time.  For the people who plan ahead your grocery store has a large selection for you to choose from. They have small boxes, big boxes, inexpensive chocolates, and gourmet chocolates. Some boxes have limited flavors and others have a multitude of flavors. All these choices are yours when they are first put onto the shelf a few weeks prior to Valentine’s Day, if you are proactive. Now as Valentine’s Day approaches your choices start to diminish because others have beat you to the shelf. And if you wait for the last minute you will either have to choose from something bigger or smaller than you really wanted, or you might be left with something cheaper or more expensive than you really wanted. And then there is a very good chance that you might not get anything at all.

And once Valentine’s Day is over you have missed out. You’re too late and now you have to wait for next year. The question is, next year are you going to wait again and be left with limited options, or are you going to plan ahead and get what you want this time?

These seasonal cruises are the same way. Caribbean cruises are offered every single week of the year, but the Canada/New England (fall foliage) cruises for example are only available for a very short period between mid-September and mid-October. And since many of these cruises are 10-14 days in duration each ship might only offer 3 voyages in an entire season. Typically, if you are looking to book one of these cruises within 6 months of departure and you want a specific type of cabin and you’re not flexible on dates then you are probably too late and most likely will not get what you want. Even if you book 9 months in advance your selection will already be limited. These types of seasonal cruises should be booked at least a year in advance.

Other seasonal destinations that you should book well in advance are Australia/New Zealand, Asia, South America, the Baltic, British Isles, and Alaska.

On top of that there could be other outside reasons why these cruises could sell out way in advance. Take this year for example. Due to some turmoil in Europe the European cruise occupancy is weak. A lot of people are avoiding Europe and are instead going to Hawaii, Alaska, the Caribbean or Canada/New England. So this year these destinations are hugely popular. Availability is down, prices are up, demand is high, and many dates are already sold out.

So not only is life “like a box of chocolates”, but so are booking cruises. Plan ahead, and increase your chances of getting what you want.

download (4)By The Cruise Butler

Steve Rice

http://www.TheCruiseButler.com

Steve@TheCruiseButler.com

 

Cruise industry’s plan to win over the haters

5 things Carnival, Royal Caribbean are doing to attract new cruisers


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About 21.7 million people are expected to take a cruise this year, up from 21.3 million last year, according to data from Cruise Lines International Association. What’s more, nearly nine in 10 cruise lines report that they’ve seen an increase in first-time cruisers. But while cruising is the fastest growing segment of the travel industry, only about one in four Americans has ever taken a cruise. (Three in four Americans, meanwhile, have taken a beach vacation). And there are millions of people for whom the idea of taking a cruise has about as much appeal as organizing their sock drawer. “Some people feel they are too cool to cruise,” says Bob Lepisto, president of cruise line SeaDream Yacht Club.

The cruise industry is concerned about attracting — and changing the minds of — the 75% of Americans who fall in the never-cruised set. “It’s a serious issue…they want to milk a few more passengers,” says Jack Plunkett, the founder of Plunkett Research. These passengers represent millions of dollars that the cruise lines are leaving on the table. “The U.S. market is not the long-term growth vehicle it used to be,” Plunkett adds.

Here’s what cruise executives from Carnival CCL -0.03%  , Royal Caribbean RCL +1.50%   and more told us they’ve done recently to attract a new crowd.

1. Acts with names you’ll recognize.

Twenty five-year-old travel specialist Kelly Yella says that cruises don’t really appeal to her age group because the entertainment tends to be dated (it’s true: millennials don’t exactly dream of Broadway shows and oldies-playing cover bands, which is the perception many have of cruise entertainment); others think there isn’t much to do beyond sunning and swimming. Indeed, both Royal Caribbean International president and CEO Adam Goldstein and Carnival Cruise Line CMO Jim Berra told MarketWatch that one of the main reasons the never-cruised set think they don’t want to cruise is that they are worried there isn’t enough to do onboard.

But, says Goldstein, “that is a quaint notion.” Carnival will feature a record 49 concerts for travelers this year, with shows from Jennifer Hudson and Lady Antebellum, among others; Royal Caribbean brings Tony Award-winning musicals onboard like Chicago and Hairspray; and Norwegian is doing a The Grammy Experience cruise, which launched this year and features Latin Grammy Award winner Nestor Torres as a headliner. “These partnerships [with well-known acts] expose our brand to fans of the partners who may have not previously considered cruising, but will now because their ‘favorite brand or celebrity’ is affiliated with us,” says Marisa Scime, the director of social media and public relations for Norwegian Cruise Line NCLH -0.06%  . Plus, the number of themed cruises has jumped from about 400 to 700 in the past three years, says Howard Miles, the founder of theme cruise listing site ThemeCruiseFinder.com.

2. Celebrity chefs and more food options.

Many potential cruisers worry about lackluster buffets filled with warm, limp iceberg lettuce and sweaty American cheese. Indeed, Carnival’s Berra says that food is one of the main concerns that the never-cruised have about getting onboard for the first time — and that’s one of the reasons that Carnival has partnered with Guy Fieri to launch on-ship burger joints. Carnival isn’t alone: Norwegian now has a partnership with the Cake Boss and restaurants by Geoffrey Zakarian and Royal Caribbean with Jamie Oliver and Michael Schwartz.

And last week, Royal Caribbean introduced what it calls “dynamic dining” — in which it is ditching the traditional dining experience (two dinner seatings) and offering a series of 18 smaller restaurants to pick from on their new Quantum of the Seas ship. It’s a move, Goldstein says, that is geared toward inexperienced cruisers (traditional cruisers, he says, seem satisfied with traditional dining options). Higher end cruise lines like SeaDream Yacht club focus on fare like raw food or gluten-free offerings, as well as mostly locally sourced menus.

3. $32-a-night cruises and kids-sail-free promotions.

Roscoe Mathieu, a 27-year-old writer living in China, says that “the #1 reason” he doesn’t want to cruise is the expense. “Cruises, to me, are big white ships full of old rich people reassuring each other that although they are visiting some exotic clime or other, they do not have to interact with the countries or peoples they visit in any way,” he says; for the money, he feels he can do better elsewhere.

How cruise ship companies are trying to attract first-time cruisers

If you think cruises have bland food, screaming children, and viruses that spread like wildfire, cruise executives have a plan to change that. Catey Hill reports. Photo: Getty.

Both Goldstein and Berra say that one of the big barriers to getting first-time cruisers is price. “People think it is more expensive than it is,” Berra says. So the cruise lines in the past year have thrown out some compelling deals. Carolyn Brown, the editor-in-chief ofCruiseCritic.com , says that this year’s unprecedented breadth of kids-sail-free deals — offered by Norwegian, Royal Caribbean, Azamara and Carnival — were designed to attract new cruisers. Indeed, Carnival’s Berra confirms that Carnival’s deal was intended to bring the never-cruised on board by making it more affordable for them to cruise.

The deals weren’t just limited to kids-sail-free promotions. After the norovirus outbreak on Royal Caribbean earlier this year — these kinds of incidents tend to put off those who have never cruised more than old timers, surveys show — the cruise line offered up rates of $32 per person per night. And cruise prices overall hit near record lows last year amidst the bad press.

On the higher end of the cruise spectrum, it isn’t about price but about not nickeling and diming consumers. Kunal S. Kamlani, president of Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises says that they try to get new cruisers by focusing on how they don’t nickel and dime consumers on everything from shore excursions to cocktails. “We’ve strategically taken a more inclusive nature to cruising,” he says. “With Oceania Cruises, we include roundtrip air and complimentary amenities without compromise such as dining at all specialty restaurants, unlimited non-alcoholic beverages and free shuttle services from the ship to city centers in most ports of call.”

4. Satisfaction guarantees.

Many people — especially those who had never cruised before — were put off from cruising by incidents like viral outbreaks, the poop cruise and the crash that happened in the past few years. Glenmore, Penn. resident Susan Murray, 61, says that she will “never take a cruise, due to the prevalence of norovirus.” And 25-year old travel specialist Kelly Yella says that “not only have I never been on a cruise, I’ve never booked a cruise for a client…I think cruises have become a joke for most travelers, especially after the Carnival Cruise mishaps.”

Indeed, in May 2013 following the Carnival Triumph incident, 43% of consumers who had previously taken a cruise said they were “less likely to take a cruise now than a year ago” but that number jumped to 58% of those who had never taken a cruise. Carnival responded by offering a satisfaction guarantee — which it is still offering — that gave unsatisfied consumers a 110% refund — a move made in hopes of attracting new cruisers. “It’s designed to reassure people who say ‘I’ve never tried this before, what if I don’t like it,’” says Berra.

5. Faster, cheaper Wi-Fi.

Connecting to the web on a cruise ship has long been a pricey hassle. “Fifteen or twenty years ago, a staple element [of cruise lines’ messaging] was that cruising was one of the great ways to disconnect,” says Goldstein. “That message is unthinkable today.” But now, many cruise lines are scrambling to offer cruisers access to WiFi — an offering that Goldstein says appeals to new cruisers who don’t want to be disconnected for the duration of a cruise. Royal Caribbean, for example, is testing a new, faster Wi-Fi network on its Oasis of the Seas ships and says it hopes that by the end of summer it will be operable on three of its ships.

Despite these moves, some of those who have never cruised say things like these won’t change their minds about cruising: just because there is a celebrity chef, music act and cheap prices doesn’t mean that the experience is up to their standards. Indeed, the hatred of cruises is so pervasive in some circles that there is even a cottage industry of cruise lines that are pitching themselves as an anti-cruise cruise line with things like smaller ships that house only a limited number of passengers (often 200 or fewer, compared with the thousand-plus on larger lines), more immersive shore excursions (you get off the boat for many hours and go to culturally significant or unique spots) and locally sourced foods or unique dining options. Un-Cruise Adventures (yes, the name is deliberate; the company changed it to that last year) is one of them, trying to appeal to travelers who aren’t interested in the traditional big ship experience, says Tim Jacox, the executive vice president of sales and marketing of Un-Cruise Adventures. The ships house a maximum of 88 guests and take people into remote areas — think inner river passages of Alaska — where larger ships can’t go. Another cruise line, SeaDream Yacht Club (notice the name doesn’t say cruise), says that its mission is to “deliver a cruise that’s like a yachting experience.” The ship is limited to 112 passengers, has a nearly 1 to 1 staff to traveler ratio, lets passengers stay in ports until late in the evening, and just began offering an entire raw food menu last year.

Still, many objections to cruises are misconceptions, says Stewart Chiron, founder ofCruiseGuy.com . For example, there are many inexpensive cruise options, especially for those who can take advantage of last-minute deals, and the incidence of norovirus — while horrendous and certainly worth worrying about — is still rare on ships, as are accidents and mishaps. Plus, cruise lines like Carnival and Royal Caribbean have made a number of recent moves to make their ships safer.

The “10 Commandments of Travel”

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Due to all the bad advise that I constantly hear I have developed a new set of the “10 Commandments”. Please use this as a travel resource when booking your next vacation. Trust me……you will have a better overall experience and your money will go farther.

The Cruise Butler

830-981-2445

http://www.TheCruiseButler.com

 

 

Quantum of the Seas and all her brand new dining room options.

Royal Caribbean ditches traditional dining on the Quantum

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    Royal Caribbean’s Quantum of the Seas is changing the way cruisers eat by ditching complementary main dining rooms and introducing new restaurants where passengers can pick a cuisine of their choice. (ROYAL CARIBBEAN)

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    Jamie Oliver’s new eatery on board the Quantum of the Seas. (ROYAL CARIBBEAN)

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    American Icon Grill will serve classic American road trip food selected from American cities from “sea to shining sea.” (ROYAL CARIBBEAN)

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    The Grande will feature classic cuisine such as Beef Wellington, Chicken a l’Orange, Roasted Scallops and Sole Almandine.(ROYAL CARIBBEAN)

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    Michael’s Genuine Pub is inspired by the creations of James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Schwartz. (ROYAL CARIBBEAN)

Royal Caribbean this week announced a new way of dining, ditching the traditional main dining room with assigned seating and replacing it with five restaurants where passengers can pick a cuisine of their choice.

Called Dynamic Dining, it will be offered on the Quantum of the Seas, set to debut in November.

While experienced cruisers appear perfectly happy with traditional dining, Goldstein said inexperienced travelers have the misconception that cruises are too regimented.

So no longer will there be two seatings (at 6 and 8 p.m.) in a main dining room serving crowds nearly the half the size of a ship’s passenger population.  Now, passengers will select a different dining spot every night, choosing one of the themed main dining rooms included in the cruise fare.

The Five Main Dining Rooms

From California-influenced to Pan-Asian fare, the five complimentary, full-service restaurants include a range of cuisines. Here’s a breakdown.

The American Icon Grill is where you’ll find comfort foods selected from American cities from “sea to shining sea,” the cruise line said. Featured dishes will include New Orleans gumbo, New England clam chowder and Southern fried chicken.

Chic will feature contemporary fine cuisine from fresh ingredients, offering “proteins that pack a punch.” Dishes include beef ribeye, lamb chops and Mediterranean sea bass. Entrée options will include dry aged steak, Maine lobster and veal Parmesan.

Silk will feature “Pan Asian flavors such as slow cooked lamb curry, ginger and sesame crusted tuna and sake glazed salmon.”

The Grande features classic cuisine such as Beef Wellington, Chicken a l’Orange, Roasted Scallops and Sole Almandine.

Coastal Kitchen is described as “where California cool meets the warmth of the Mediterranean.” The menu ranges from California favorites like sea bass ceviche, sliced avocado and blueberry pie to Mediterranean delicacies such as Serrano ham, goat cheese and roasted grapes.

The New Royal Caribbean Dining App

To help cruisers make reservations for these restaurants as well as many other ship amenities, Royal Caribbean is offering a new app that will work on cellphones and iPads during the cruise, or on the Internet before the cruise.

The app will show real-time availability for the on-board eateries and let users make reservations. If the dining room has ample space available, the app will show that, too. Cruisers can also use the apps to reserve shore tours and spa appointments.

The app’s main goal is to attract first-time cruisers, including skeptical Millennials. “In the old days,” Goldstein said, “we sold escape from the outside world. But today’s younger travelers want full-time access to the Internet.” Along those lines, Quantum will feature a new broadband technology for cruise ships, currently being tested aboard the line’s largest ships, Oasis and Allure of the Seas.

Of course, the app is not the only way to make reservations. More traditional cruisers can still use the telephone, access menus on their stateroom television or consult one of the “wayfinders” – navigational interactive touch-screens located throughout the ship.

Additional Specialty Dining Options

In addition to the five main dining restaurants, there are seven specialty dining spots that feature fare from celebrity chefs. These aren’t complimentary, and service charges vary.

Wonderland, open for dinner only, is described as a “culinary kaleidoscope.” In a demonstration given in New York on Wednesday, the line treated guests to a soup with Vanishing Noodles and a Chocolate Olive Fizz in a cellophane wrapper that disappears in your mouth. Other items included Sriracha eggs that appear in a plume of smoke and flash frozen ice cream atop tender pork belly.

Michael’s Genuine Pub is the brainchild of James Beard award-winning chef Michael Schwartz. Along with craft beers and the ship’s own classic American ale, the gastropub will offer pub-style snacks. It’s open for lunch and dinner.

Jamie’s Italian, open for lunch and dinner, features British chef Jamie Oliver in his first cruise ship eatery. The menu will feature mostly rustic Italian fare along with a few surprises, such as Pumpkin Panzerotti and Zingy Prawn Linguine.

Devinly Decadence, despite its misleading name, will offer fresh spa cuisine for breakfast and lunch plus an upscale dinner experience similar to the Solarium Bistro on the Oasis-class ships. The fare is inspired by Devin Alexander, the best-selling cookbook author and chef on NBC’s The Biggest Loser.  It is complimentary during breakfast and lunch; there is an extra charge for dinner.

Chops Grille is already a well-known Royal Caribbean dining spot featuring the best in steak and other cuts of meat. Options include filet mignon, braised short rib, roasted organic chicken and dry aged steak burger. This is open for dinner only.

Izumi Japanese cuisine begins with vegetable tempura or shrimp gyoza dumplings, and entrées include mixed seafood, beef tenderloin and chicken or beef skewers. This is for lunch and dinner only.

The Chef’s Table is a limited special dinner with the best gourmet food and wine or aperitif pairings with every course. This is the most expensive meal offered on the ship, and reservations are required, as well as formal dress. There are generally six to eight courses, including appetizers like foie gras, truffles risotto or lobster bisque and main courses including lamb cutlets or filet mignon.

The last three dining spots include the Windjammer Marketplace, a new name for the Lido Café found on most cruise ships. On the newer cruise ships, cafeteria-style lines have been replaced by dozens of serving stations offering individual portions of various styles of food.

One of the most talked-about new public rooms coming to Quantum is the large combination lounge in a showroom named Two70° (pronounced “two-seventy degrees”). This room will feature a gourmet marketplace menu featuring salads, soups and hot pressed sandwiches, similar to what you find in upscale urban grocery stores.

Finally, Royal Caribbean says Quantum of the Seas will be the first cruise ship with a hot dog stand, known as the Seaplex Dog House. There is no charge for the hotdogs, or the onions, mustard, relish and sauerkraut you’ll want to pile on top of them.

The End of Traditional Dining

Quantum of the Seas will be the first modern cruise ship without a main dining room. Other cruise lines like Norwegian have been offering anytime, multi-venue dining options on their ships for decades, but they have always offered complimentary traditional dining rooms, as well.

Will this be enough to bring cruise virgins to cruise ships? Goldstein believes it will, and he promises even more surprises to come on the Quantum of the Seas.